Magical Realism Mondays: The Accident Season by Moira Fowley-Doyle

a girl falling upside-down

It’s the accident season, the same time every year. Bones break, skin tears, bruises bloom.

The accident season has been part of seventeen-year-old Cara’s life for as long as she can remember. Towards the end of October, foreshadowed by the deaths of many relatives before them, Cara’s family becomes inexplicably accident-prone. They banish knives to locked drawers, cover sharp table edges with padding, switch off electrical items – but injuries follow wherever they go, and the accident season becomes an ever-growing obsession and fear.

But why are they so cursed? And how can they break free?

Title: The Accident Season
Author: Moira Fowley-Doyle
Category: Young Adult
Genre: Magical Realism
Publisher: Transworld Publishers, Corgi Childrens’
Publication Date: August 18, 2015
Format: Paperback
Length: 280 pages
ISBN-10: 055257130X
ISBN-13: 9780552571302

Series or Standalone: Standalone

Literary Awards: N/A

Themes: Abuse, Family
POV: 1st person
Tense: present

Reviewer: Marisa Greene

 

Administrative Note from Nick:  Due to a WordPress post-scheduling error, this is the unfinished draft of this review.  The full, complete review will be up as soon as Marisa has a chance to log in and make corrections.  Thanks.

Note 2:  From Marisa: I’m so sorry, guys!  I don’t know what happened!  I like to get all the non-review stuff out of the way before I actually sit down to write the review and save it as a draft.  Somehow that draft got published instead of the real post, but it’s a hassle to delete this and fix all the links, so I’m just copying and pasting the review into this post.

Where I Got It: Loaned to me by Atsiko after I heard great recs for it. I love Magical Realism, so I was very excited when Atsiko offered to loan me this book.  The premise sounded real interesting.  The cover was beautiful, as I mention below.

Cover Notes: The cover was beautiful.  I wish I saw more covers like this in YA.  I like the out of focus look and the odd orientation.  The font is nice, too.

Review: 

The writing of this book is the kind people like to call atmospheric.  it really makes you feel like you imagine the characters feel.  Which is odd in a 1st person narrative, but really nifty.  The opening is a bit contemplative for my taste, I think.  Very introspective and a lot of what I’d call exposition.  I don’t necessarily love the main character, Cara’s voice.  it’s a bit bland for my taste, although you might argue that contrasts well with the magical side of magical realism.  It’s a lot easier to take seriously when described by such an every girl.  Whereas if her best friend, Bea, was the narrator, her wild world-view would ground the piece.  A re-write from Bea’s perspective could be very illuminating, though probably not worth it for the author or most readers.

To be honest, the major flaw with the narrator is that besides her ex-step-brother Sam, I find basically all of the other main characters more interesting.  While they are built from their own stereotypes, the author does a great job of making it seem like they have lives beyond the narrator.  They do things with each other that don’t involve Cara, and that they must know would even be hurtful to her.  In a lot of YA, there’s so much focus on the narrator or their antagonist or their LI, that the relationships between the secondary characters get underfed.  The side characters and their independence are definitely one of the strengths of this book.

The plot is not a fast-paced headlong rush of action.  Even some contemporary or magical realist stories insist on a fast pace with a few slow interludes.  But I think Accident Season does very well with the slow unfolding and a few quick scenes instead.  I also enjoyed how, like in Nova Ren Suma’s Imaginary Girls, the normal activities of teenagers function so well to drive the plot forward.  It never seemed like anything was forced to advance the plot.  That’s a rare trait in a lot of books, YA and Adult.

The conclusion was a bit disappointing for me, especially given how much I enjoyed the build-up.  It fit the Magical Realist pattern beautifully, but it seemed a bit too pat, especially in the romantic arcs.  It’s quite obvious in my eyes who Cara will end up with, but two of the side characters ended up together in the one seeming authorial intrusion in the novel.  And the implications of that coupling irritated me.  They seemed a bit sexist, I think.  And if that had to be the pairing, I would have preferred it to not work out, be a sort of a tragic miss or just a case of unfortunate circumstances.

While there’s nothing new or innovative in the underpinnings of this story, or how it worked out, I think the arrangement of pieces was very adept and satisfying.

The one thing I’m unsure about is the setting.  This could really have been set in any English-speaking place.  There wasn’t anything in particular that anchored the book in small-town Ireland, County Mayo.  It could as easily have been in the Midwestern or Northeastern US in the month October.  I was a bit disappointed by that.  Or maybe I just missed the clues?

The premise of the accident season, which I really should have touched on earlier given its titular role in the story was one of my favorite parts of the story.  Even as just a character superstition without the magical realist elements, I think it could have been a strong basis for a story, even this story.  It’s unique as a device in my experience, but it’s totally believable that a real person would think this way, and the author does nothing to ruin that effect.

Overall, this was a solid story with some really fun elements.  It sits in the middle of my list of favorite Magical Realism novels.  I look forward to further work by this author.

Conclusion: 76/100 (A good book, though not great)
Premise: 9/10 (Accident season: really cool and original)
Plot: 8/10 (Solid and few plot holes, if any)
Setting: 7/10 (Atmospheric and believable, though not rooted strongly in a specific real-world place)
Main Character: 7/10 (Not bad, but overshadowed by the side-characters)
Magical Realism: 9/10 (Beautifully balanced ambiguity between reality and whimsy)
Romance: 4/10 (Predictable and boring, even disappointing)
Supporting Characters: 9/10 (Well-drawn, independent actors)
Writing: 8/10 (Beautiful and served the story)
Themes: 8/10 (Not new, but very well-explored)
Resolution: 7/10 (Good parts and bad)

Buy Or Borrow:  It’s definitely worth buying if you’re a big fan of (YA) magical realism.  If you like to visit but not stay, maybe borrow it from a friend.

Similar Books:

Imaginary Girls by Nova Ren Suma
We Were Liars by E. Lockhart
Bone Gap by Laura Ruby
All Our Pretty Songs by Sarah McCarry

Interviews:

Writing.ie

Other Reviews:
GoodReads
Kirkus Reviews
TeenReads
The Book Smugglers (at Kirkus)
It Starts at Midnight
MuggleNet
Please Feed the Bookworm

Buy Links:
Amazon
Barnes and Noble
IndieBound

E-Books:
iBooks
Kindle UK
Kindle US
Kobo
Google Play
nook

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Magical Realism Mondays

A popular new genre in YA fiction is that of Magical Realism.  There are various definitions, but it is essentially a literary genre in which the fantastic is presented as no more remarkable than the mundane.  Also referred to as fabulism or new fabulism, it generally consists one no more than a couple fantastic elements in an otherwise normal world, generally unexplained, though often with an alternative rationalist explanation not privileged over the fantastic by the author or even sometimes the characters.

 

As of this leap day, we will be instituting a new feature, Magical Realism Mondays, where on the first or second Monday of each month, Marisa will be reviewing, possibly with spoilers, a Magical Realist YA novel, beginning with  Moira Fowley-Doyle’s The Accident Season.  Spoiler alerts will be posted if necessary.

Regularly scheduled ARC and post-pub reviews will still be posted, just not on these day.